• Money and Finance: Crash Course Economics #11

    So, we've been putting off a kind of basic question here. What is money? What is currency? How are the two different. Well, not to give away too much, but money has a few basic functions. It acts as a store of value, a medium of exchange, and as a unit of account. Money isn't just bills and coins. It can be anything that meets these three criteria. In US prisons, apparently, pouches of Mackerel are currency. Yes, mackerel the fish. Paper and coins work as money because they're backed by the government, which is an advantage over mackerel. So, once you've got money, you need finance. We'll talk about borrowing, lending, interest, and stocks and bonds. Also, this episode features a giant zucchini, which Adriene grew in her garden. So that's cool. Special thanks to Dave Hunt for permission t...

    published: 14 Oct 2015
  • Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15

    What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, S...

    published: 20 Nov 2015
  • What's all the Yellen About? Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve: Crash Course Economics #10

    This week on Crash Course Economics, we're talking about monetary policy. The reality of the world is that the United States (and most of the world's economies) are, to varying degrees, Keynesian. When things go wrong, economically, the central bank of the country intervenes to try aand get things back on track. In the United States, the Federal Reserve is the organization that steps in to use monetary policy to steer the economy. When the Fed, as it's called, does step in, there are a few different tacks it can take. The Fed can change interest rates, or it can change the money supply. This is pretty interesting stuff, and it's what we're getting into today. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the followin...

    published: 08 Oct 2015
  • IMF Economist Program 2016

    The Economist Program (EP) is the primary entry point for economists to join the IMF soon after completion of their graduate studies. This video will explain more about the program and what it is like to be an EP participant.

    published: 23 Sep 2015
  • Economic Systems and Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #3

    In which Jacob Clifford and Adriene Hill teach you about Economic Systems and Macroeconomics. So, economics is basically about choices. We'll look at some of the broadest economic choices when we talk about the difference between planned economies and market economies. We'll get into communism, socialism, command economies, and capitalism. We'll look at how countries choose the kind of system they're going to use (spoiler alert: many end up with mixed economies). We'll also look into how individuals make economic choices. Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Ann...

    published: 30 Jul 2015
  • IMF Economist Program (EP) -- Gateway to an International Career

    The following clip shows testimonials of what it is like to work as an Economist in the Economist Program at the International Monetary Fund.

    published: 14 Jun 2011
  • Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28

    How much should you get paid for your job? Well, that depends on a lot of factors. Your skill set, the demand for the skills you have, and what other people are getting paid around you all factor in. In a lot of ways, labor markets work on supply and demand, just like many of the markets we talk about in Crash Course Econ. But, again, there aren't a lot of pure, true markets in the world. There are all kinds of oddities and regulations that change the way labor markets work. One common (and kind of controversial one) is the minimum wage. The minimum wage has potential upsides and downsides, and we'll take a look at the various arguments for an against it. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Pa...

    published: 27 Mar 2016
  • 30 Things You Should Do To Prepare For The Imminent Economic Collapse & Stock Market CRASH!

    The Housing Crash Coming! One Of The Best Video About The Economic Collapse 2017 Stock Market CRASH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ts8eRQhjni4 Today, millions of Americans say that they believe that the United States is on the verge of a major economic collapse and will soon be entering another big stock market crash and Great Depression. But only a small percentage of those same people are prepared for that to happen.  The sad truth is that the vast majority of Americans would last little more than a month on what they have stored up in their homes. Most of us are so used to running out to the supermarket or to Wall-Mart for whatever we need that we never even stop to consider what would happen if suddenly we were not able to do that when the economic collapse happen. Experts predict th...

    published: 04 May 2017
  • Passive Investing: The Evidence the Fund Management Industry Would Prefer You Not to See

    http://sensibleinvesting.tv -- the independent voice of passive investing A remarkable 54-minute film featuring some of the world's top economists and academics and demonstrating: * how the claims of active fund managers to be able to beat the market are largely a myth * how costs are the biggest drag on performance - and why active costs more * how passive investing offers the best experience for the vast majority of investors * the benefits of a diversified portfolio in guaranteeing consistent returns * why passive investing is better for your health * why active investing has held sway for so many years.... * ... but why things may be changing * and why passive is the rational, mathematically proven route to investing success. Investing for the future... It's an issue none of can affo...

    published: 30 Nov 2012
  • How The Economic Machine Works by Ray Dalio

    Economics 101 -- "How the Economic Machine Works." Created by Ray Dalio this simple but not simplistic and easy to follow 30 minute, animated video answers the question, "How does the economy really work?" Based on Dalio's practical template for understanding the economy, which he developed over the course of his career, the video breaks down economic concepts like credit, deficits and interest rates, allowing viewers to learn the basic driving forces behind the economy, how economic policies work and why economic cycles occur. To learn more about Economic Principles visit: http://www.economicprinciples.org. [Also Available In Chinese] 经济这台机器是怎样运行的: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZbeYejg9Pk [Also Available In Russian] Как действует экономическая машина. Автор: Рэй Далио (на русском ...

    published: 22 Sep 2013
  • Saving the World Economy: Paul Krugman and Olivier Blanchard in Conversation

    Two of the foremost experts on the international economy, Paul Krugman and Olivier Blanchard, engage in a discussion about recent crises around the world and how to prevent global economic collapse. Paul Krugman is a Nobel Prize-winning economist, noted New York Times columnist and author, and distinguished professor in the Ph.D. Program in Economics at the Graduate Center. Olivier Blanchard, chief economist at the International Monetary Fund from 2008 to 2015, is a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics and Robert M. Solow Professor of Economics emeritus at MIT. Presented on December 7, 2015, by GC Public Programs and the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies.

    published: 21 Dec 2015
  • Bird and Fortune - Subprime Crisis

    John Bird and John Fortune (the Long Johns) brilliantly, and accurately, describing the mindset of the investment banking community in this satirical interview.

    published: 14 Feb 2008
  • IMF Economists: 'Trickle Down Economics Doesn't Work'

    Shop through Amazon by clicking this link and support TYT Nation! http://ow.ly/LAKHU "Researchers found that when the top earners in society make more money, it actually slows down economic growth. On the other hand, when poorer people earn more, society as a whole benefits. The researchers calculated that when the richest 20% of society increase their income by one percentage point, the annual rate of growth shrinks by nearly 0.1% within five years. This shows that "the benefits do not trickle down," the researchers wrote in their report, which analyzed over 150 countries." http://money.cnn.com/2015/06/15/news/economy/trickle-down-theory-wrong-imf/index.html?iid=SF_LN Support our channel, become a patron and help us build a better Nation: http://www.patreon.com/TYTNation Like Our Face...

    published: 24 Jun 2015
  • Fisheries Economics & Policy: Maximum Economic Yield

    This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. This video covers maximum economic yield in fishing and fishing quotas. We'll compare growth rates and fish populations and look at where on the growth curve the population reaches sustainability. We'll also introduce the concepts of fishing effort, economic rent and maximum sustainable yields. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservati...

    published: 20 Nov 2014
  • Banned TED Talk: Nick Hanauer "Rich people don't create jobs"

    Via Business Insider: "As the war over income inequality wages on, super-rich Seattle entrepreneur Nick Hanauer has been raising the hackles of his fellow 1-percenters, espousing the contrarian argument that rich people don't actually create jobs. The position is controversial — so much so that TED is refusing to post a talk that Hanauer gave on the subject. National Journal reports today that TED officials decided not to put Hanauer's March 1 speech up online after deeming his remarks "too politically controversial" for the site...".

    published: 18 May 2012
  • Where Nobel Economists Put Their Money

    A lot of wealth is gone, and there is no reason for it to come back. That was the summation of Robert C. Merton, one of three Nobel Prizewinning economists who joined intellectual forces last week at the School of Managements three-day Future of Life Cycle Saving and Investing Conference. Merton, along with Robert Solow and Paul Samuelson, took questions about the impending retirement savings crisis from PBS NewsHour correspondent Paul Solman at an October 23 after-dinner panel discussion, What Retirement Means to Me, that will be aired in part on the public television program. I believe this is a permanent decline, said Merton. I do not think this is a liquidity event. He told the audience, which included faculty from business schools around the world, that $4 trillion has been lost...

    published: 29 Oct 2008
Money and Finance: Crash Course Economics #11

Money and Finance: Crash Course Economics #11

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:36
  • Updated: 14 Oct 2015
  • views: 414163
videos
So, we've been putting off a kind of basic question here. What is money? What is currency? How are the two different. Well, not to give away too much, but money has a few basic functions. It acts as a store of value, a medium of exchange, and as a unit of account. Money isn't just bills and coins. It can be anything that meets these three criteria. In US prisons, apparently, pouches of Mackerel are currency. Yes, mackerel the fish. Paper and coins work as money because they're backed by the government, which is an advantage over mackerel. So, once you've got money, you need finance. We'll talk about borrowing, lending, interest, and stocks and bonds. Also, this episode features a giant zucchini, which Adriene grew in her garden. So that's cool. Special thanks to Dave Hunt for permission to use his PiPhone video. this guy really did make an artisanal smartphone! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eaiNsFhtI8 Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/Money_And_Finance_Crash_Course_Economics_11
Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15

Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:11
  • Updated: 20 Nov 2015
  • views: 499202
videos
What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/Imports,_Exports,_And_Exchange_Rates_Crash_Course_Economics_15
What's all the Yellen About? Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve: Crash Course Economics #10

What's all the Yellen About? Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve: Crash Course Economics #10

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:25
  • Updated: 08 Oct 2015
  • views: 460258
videos
This week on Crash Course Economics, we're talking about monetary policy. The reality of the world is that the United States (and most of the world's economies) are, to varying degrees, Keynesian. When things go wrong, economically, the central bank of the country intervenes to try aand get things back on track. In the United States, the Federal Reserve is the organization that steps in to use monetary policy to steer the economy. When the Fed, as it's called, does step in, there are a few different tacks it can take. The Fed can change interest rates, or it can change the money supply. This is pretty interesting stuff, and it's what we're getting into today. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/What's_All_The_Yellen_About_Monetary_Policy_And_The_Federal_Reserve_Crash_Course_Economics_10
IMF Economist Program 2016

IMF Economist Program 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:38
  • Updated: 23 Sep 2015
  • views: 3726
videos
The Economist Program (EP) is the primary entry point for economists to join the IMF soon after completion of their graduate studies. This video will explain more about the program and what it is like to be an EP participant.
https://wn.com/Imf_Economist_Program_2016
Economic Systems and Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #3

Economic Systems and Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #3

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:18
  • Updated: 30 Jul 2015
  • views: 985155
videos
In which Jacob Clifford and Adriene Hill teach you about Economic Systems and Macroeconomics. So, economics is basically about choices. We'll look at some of the broadest economic choices when we talk about the difference between planned economies and market economies. We'll get into communism, socialism, command economies, and capitalism. We'll look at how countries choose the kind of system they're going to use (spoiler alert: many end up with mixed economies). We'll also look into how individuals make economic choices. Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Anna-Ester Volozh, Robert Kunz, Jason A Saslow, Christian Ludvigsen, Chris Peters, Brad Wardell, Beatrice Jin, Roger C. Rocha, Eric Knight, Jessica Simmons, Jeffrey Thompson, Elliot Beter, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Ian Dundore, Jessica Wode, SR Foxley, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, Steve Marshall TO: Everyone FROM: Martin To gild refined gold is just silly. TO: Dana FROM: Cameron Still holding out. We're going to make it! Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Raymond Cason, Marcel Pogorzelski, Cowgirlgem, Chua Chen Wei, Catherine Emond, Victoria Uney, Robin Uney, Damian Shaw, Sverre Rabbelier Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/Economic_Systems_And_Macroeconomics_Crash_Course_Economics_3
IMF Economist Program (EP) -- Gateway to an International Career

IMF Economist Program (EP) -- Gateway to an International Career

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:07
  • Updated: 14 Jun 2011
  • views: 12835
videos
The following clip shows testimonials of what it is like to work as an Economist in the Economist Program at the International Monetary Fund.
https://wn.com/Imf_Economist_Program_(Ep)_Gateway_To_An_International_Career
Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28

Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:38
  • Updated: 27 Mar 2016
  • views: 299422
videos
How much should you get paid for your job? Well, that depends on a lot of factors. Your skill set, the demand for the skills you have, and what other people are getting paid around you all factor in. In a lot of ways, labor markets work on supply and demand, just like many of the markets we talk about in Crash Course Econ. But, again, there aren't a lot of pure, true markets in the world. There are all kinds of oddities and regulations that change the way labor markets work. One common (and kind of controversial one) is the minimum wage. The minimum wage has potential upsides and downsides, and we'll take a look at the various arguments for an against it. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/Labor_Markets_And_Minimum_Wage_Crash_Course_Economics_28
30 Things You Should Do To Prepare For The Imminent Economic Collapse & Stock Market CRASH!

30 Things You Should Do To Prepare For The Imminent Economic Collapse & Stock Market CRASH!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 25:27
  • Updated: 04 May 2017
  • views: 570351
videos
The Housing Crash Coming! One Of The Best Video About The Economic Collapse 2017 Stock Market CRASH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ts8eRQhjni4 Today, millions of Americans say that they believe that the United States is on the verge of a major economic collapse and will soon be entering another big stock market crash and Great Depression. But only a small percentage of those same people are prepared for that to happen.  The sad truth is that the vast majority of Americans would last little more than a month on what they have stored up in their homes. Most of us are so used to running out to the supermarket or to Wall-Mart for whatever we need that we never even stop to consider what would happen if suddenly we were not able to do that when the economic collapse happen. Experts predict that the stock market crash will happen in this year and the economic collapse 2017 is inevitable. When the economic collapse and stock market crash occurs, it will happen quickly. No one will predict it. That's because the signs of the economic collapse are difficult to see. For example, the U.S. economic collapse and stock market crash happened on September 17, 2008. That's the day panicked investors withdrew a record $140 billion from money market accounts.  That's where businesses keep the cash to fund day-to-day operations. If withdrawals had gone on for even a week, the entire economy would have halted. If the economy collapses, you will not have access to credit. Banks will close. That means high demand, and low supply, of food, gas and other necessities. If the economic collapse affects local governments and utilities, then water and electricity will no longer be available... The Economic Doomsday is here. The second financial bubble is going to soon burst, and there’s nothing anyone can do about it. The Federal Reserve has set up the American economy for financial collapse for printing trillions of dollars back in 2008 and 2009. The Federal Reserve’s policies of printing trillions of dollars back in ’08-09 have locked into place a serious financial crisis at some point in our future. Going so far as to intimate the financial collapse and market crash will occur at least some time in the next two years, “It’s unavoidable, and even Donald Trump can’t stop it. Top economists predict that within the next 18-24 months, the imminent economic collapse will happen. The Federal Reserve has set up the American economy for financial collapse and market crash for printing trillions of dollars back in 2008 and 2009. The Federal Reserve’s policies of printing trillions of dollars back in ’08-09 have locked into place a serious financial crisis....
https://wn.com/30_Things_You_Should_Do_To_Prepare_For_The_Imminent_Economic_Collapse_Stock_Market_Crash
Passive Investing: The Evidence the Fund Management Industry Would Prefer You Not to See

Passive Investing: The Evidence the Fund Management Industry Would Prefer You Not to See

  • Order:
  • Duration: 53:54
  • Updated: 30 Nov 2012
  • views: 257810
videos
http://sensibleinvesting.tv -- the independent voice of passive investing A remarkable 54-minute film featuring some of the world's top economists and academics and demonstrating: * how the claims of active fund managers to be able to beat the market are largely a myth * how costs are the biggest drag on performance - and why active costs more * how passive investing offers the best experience for the vast majority of investors * the benefits of a diversified portfolio in guaranteeing consistent returns * why passive investing is better for your health * why active investing has held sway for so many years.... * ... but why things may be changing * and why passive is the rational, mathematically proven route to investing success. Investing for the future... It's an issue none of can afford to ignore. No one's job is safe these days... How would you cope if you lost yours? We're all living longer too... So are you saving enough to fund 25 years or more of retirement? Can you really afford to pay for your children or grandchildren to go to university - or help them onto the property ladder? And what about all those holidays you promised yourself? We entrust the vast bulk of our investments to fund managers. Here in the UK, according to Her Majesty's Treasury, the industry has more than four TRILLION pounds of investors' money under management. Fund managers invest people's savings wherever they see fit - mainly in equities, or shares in listed companies. They claim to be experts at making our making grow, using their expert knowledge to pick the shares that will outperform the market. But all too often the returns they produce are considerably lower than the average return of a benchmark index like the FTSE 100 - or the S&P 500 in the States. For veteran investment guru John Bogle, the problem is simple. Fund managers just aren't as smart as they like to think they are. As it means trading against the view of numerous market participants with superior information, buying or selling a security is effectively just a bet. So, whilst your fund manager might lead you to believe it's his knowledge or intelligence that enables you to beat the market, he's really no better than a gambler. So, you might be lucky enough to choose the right fund manager. But you could just as easily pick the wrong one. According to the financial services company Bestinvest, there are currently nearly £10 billion of UK investors' money languishing in what it calls dog funds - in other words, funds which have underperperformed their benchmark index for at least three consecutive years. Ultimately, of course, fund managers are businesses. They exist to make money for themselves. They want our business - even if it means persuading us to invest in a fund which they themselves wouldn't want to put their own money in. It's now time to look at what it actually costs us to invest. Fund managers are, of course, businesses. And, like all business, they have overheads. Running a big fund management company doesn't come cheap - esepcially when top managers earn around £2 million a year, including bonuses. And remember, it's you, the customer, who picks up the tab. Ultimately, though, fund managers need to make a profit. In fact they'e making around £10 billion from us every year - and that's regardless of whether or not they manage to produce a profit for us. Part of the challenge is working out exactly what we are being charged. Investors typically use something called the annual Total Expense Ratio, or TER, to compare the cost of investing in different funds. But, the TER excludes dealing commission, stamp duty and other turnover costs that can add considerably to the expense of investing over time. So, apart from those hidden charges, what else are we having to pay? More importantly, what sort of impact do charges have on the value of our investments? And the bad news doesn't stop there. Despite a marked increase in competition, management charges in the UK have been steadily rising over the last ten years. There are some encouraging signs for consumers. The FSA's Retail Distribution Review will require fund managers to be fairer and more transparent when it comes to charges. In the meantime, investors should be on their guard. For more videos like this one, visit http://sensibleinvesting.tv
https://wn.com/Passive_Investing_The_Evidence_The_Fund_Management_Industry_Would_Prefer_You_Not_To_See
How The Economic Machine Works by Ray Dalio

How The Economic Machine Works by Ray Dalio

  • Order:
  • Duration: 31:00
  • Updated: 22 Sep 2013
  • views: 4116252
videos
Economics 101 -- "How the Economic Machine Works." Created by Ray Dalio this simple but not simplistic and easy to follow 30 minute, animated video answers the question, "How does the economy really work?" Based on Dalio's practical template for understanding the economy, which he developed over the course of his career, the video breaks down economic concepts like credit, deficits and interest rates, allowing viewers to learn the basic driving forces behind the economy, how economic policies work and why economic cycles occur. To learn more about Economic Principles visit: http://www.economicprinciples.org. [Also Available In Chinese] 经济这台机器是怎样运行的: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZbeYejg9Pk [Also Available In Russian] Как действует экономическая машина. Автор: Рэй Далио (на русском языке): http://youtu.be/8BaNOlIfMLE
https://wn.com/How_The_Economic_Machine_Works_By_Ray_Dalio
Saving the World Economy: Paul Krugman and Olivier Blanchard in Conversation

Saving the World Economy: Paul Krugman and Olivier Blanchard in Conversation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:13:37
  • Updated: 21 Dec 2015
  • views: 38046
videos
Two of the foremost experts on the international economy, Paul Krugman and Olivier Blanchard, engage in a discussion about recent crises around the world and how to prevent global economic collapse. Paul Krugman is a Nobel Prize-winning economist, noted New York Times columnist and author, and distinguished professor in the Ph.D. Program in Economics at the Graduate Center. Olivier Blanchard, chief economist at the International Monetary Fund from 2008 to 2015, is a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics and Robert M. Solow Professor of Economics emeritus at MIT. Presented on December 7, 2015, by GC Public Programs and the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies.
https://wn.com/Saving_The_World_Economy_Paul_Krugman_And_Olivier_Blanchard_In_Conversation
Bird and Fortune - Subprime Crisis

Bird and Fortune - Subprime Crisis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:50
  • Updated: 14 Feb 2008
  • views: 1656473
videos
John Bird and John Fortune (the Long Johns) brilliantly, and accurately, describing the mindset of the investment banking community in this satirical interview.
https://wn.com/Bird_And_Fortune_Subprime_Crisis
IMF Economists: 'Trickle Down Economics Doesn't Work'

IMF Economists: 'Trickle Down Economics Doesn't Work'

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:20
  • Updated: 24 Jun 2015
  • views: 2680
videos
Shop through Amazon by clicking this link and support TYT Nation! http://ow.ly/LAKHU "Researchers found that when the top earners in society make more money, it actually slows down economic growth. On the other hand, when poorer people earn more, society as a whole benefits. The researchers calculated that when the richest 20% of society increase their income by one percentage point, the annual rate of growth shrinks by nearly 0.1% within five years. This shows that "the benefits do not trickle down," the researchers wrote in their report, which analyzed over 150 countries." http://money.cnn.com/2015/06/15/news/economy/trickle-down-theory-wrong-imf/index.html?iid=SF_LN Support our channel, become a patron and help us build a better Nation: http://www.patreon.com/TYTNation Like Our Facebook Page! http://www.Facebook.com/TYTNation TYT Nation is Your Channel, Your Voice If you want to be on TYT Nation, send us your clips: http://upload.theyoungturks.com Subscribe to TYT Nation: http://www.youtube.com/tytnation Subscribe to our Network Partner: The Young Turks. http://www.youtube.com/theyoungturks http://www.tytnetwork.com
https://wn.com/Imf_Economists_'Trickle_Down_Economics_Doesn't_Work'
Fisheries Economics & Policy: Maximum Economic Yield

Fisheries Economics & Policy: Maximum Economic Yield

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  • Duration: 15:41
  • Updated: 20 Nov 2014
  • views: 31404
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. This video covers maximum economic yield in fishing and fishing quotas. We'll compare growth rates and fish populations and look at where on the growth curve the population reaches sustainability. We'll also introduce the concepts of fishing effort, economic rent and maximum sustainable yields. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/ For copyright information on all sound effects, see http://www.conservation-strategy.org/en/page/csf-economic-video-lessons-sound-references
https://wn.com/Fisheries_Economics_Policy_Maximum_Economic_Yield
Banned TED Talk: Nick Hanauer "Rich people don't create jobs"

Banned TED Talk: Nick Hanauer "Rich people don't create jobs"

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  • Duration: 5:50
  • Updated: 18 May 2012
  • views: 2593357
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Via Business Insider: "As the war over income inequality wages on, super-rich Seattle entrepreneur Nick Hanauer has been raising the hackles of his fellow 1-percenters, espousing the contrarian argument that rich people don't actually create jobs. The position is controversial — so much so that TED is refusing to post a talk that Hanauer gave on the subject. National Journal reports today that TED officials decided not to put Hanauer's March 1 speech up online after deeming his remarks "too politically controversial" for the site...".
https://wn.com/Banned_Ted_Talk_Nick_Hanauer_Rich_People_Don't_Create_Jobs
Where Nobel Economists Put Their Money

Where Nobel Economists Put Their Money

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  • Duration: 3:45
  • Updated: 29 Oct 2008
  • views: 29415
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A lot of wealth is gone, and there is no reason for it to come back. That was the summation of Robert C. Merton, one of three Nobel Prizewinning economists who joined intellectual forces last week at the School of Managements three-day Future of Life Cycle Saving and Investing Conference. Merton, along with Robert Solow and Paul Samuelson, took questions about the impending retirement savings crisis from PBS NewsHour correspondent Paul Solman at an October 23 after-dinner panel discussion, What Retirement Means to Me, that will be aired in part on the public television program. I believe this is a permanent decline, said Merton. I do not think this is a liquidity event. He told the audience, which included faculty from business schools around the world, that $4 trillion has been lost in real estate, and another $8 trillion to $9 trillion has been lost in the stock market. Asked by Solman if the current down market makes this a good time to invest, Samuelson, perhaps the preeminent American economist of the 20th century and the sole winner of the 1970 Nobel, expressed uncertainty. History teaches no lessons, he said. You dont know when to get back in. Speaking to a packed house in SMGs fourth-floor dining room, the Nobel laureates several times digressed with teasing banter. Asked when he planned to retire, the 93-year-old Samuelson explained that he would have to grow up before he considered retirement. Solow, who at 84 is the Foundation Fellow at the Russell Sage Foundation (where he succeeded Mertons father, sociologist Robert K. Merton), said he believed that he had retired several years earlier when he gave up his teaching salary at MIT. Both Samuelson and Solow taught economics for many years at MIT; Merton is the John and Natty McArthur University Professor at Harvard Business School. When Solman questioned the experts about the distribution of their own investments, they returned some surprising answers. Solow, who won the Nobel in 1987, said he had no idea what was in his portfolio. I just never paid any attention, he said. Thats because I dont care. And Im lucky to have a wife who doesnt care. Merton described his portfolio as almost perfect — you just have to get short. The Harvard economist, who won the Nobel Prize in economics in 1997 for his study of stock options, later revealed that the bulk of his portfolio was in a Global Index Fund, Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities, and one hedge fund. He said he had been invested in a commercial real estate fund until recently, but dropped that when its value rose too quickly for his comfort. Searching for a more optimistic note, Merton pointed out that most people are still living in the houses theyve been used to living in. But, he reminded the audience, the value of those houses is considerably less than it used to be. In the coming years, he said, the people who will fare best are those who enjoy their work. If you happen to be doing what you like, he said, thats a pretty good deal. Asked what advice he had for young people today, Solow offered three short words: Earn and save. For more Boston University news and videos, check out http://today.bu.edu.
https://wn.com/Where_Nobel_Economists_Put_Their_Money